Influences in London don’t just fall from the sky: check out its museums, galleries and concert spaces. Even the disparate works of a nineteenth century painter and a modern day sculptor show how different disciplines and genres crossover into the consciousness of artist and viewer. In the performing arts, cross fertilisation is quicker, but easier to trace. The BBC orchestra continues to collaborate with mainstream pop culture and even the monolithic sound of the world’s greatest rock band is grown from the seeds sown by the recently departed Chuck Berry.

Matisse in the Studio – Royal Academy
Matisse in the Studio – Royal Academy
As Matisse seems now to be the acknowledged inspiration behind modern art, an exhibition detailing his influences is obviously going to be a big draw. What the Royal Academy has down, however, is to take the seemingly random objects which inspired the Frenchman and juxtaposed them with the appropriate paintings.

It’s an interesting approach and one which actually makes appreciation of Matisse’s genius even more acute. An African mask or a floral vase is transformed into paintings full of deep majesty and emotion. Students will find plenty to inspire them and even the most casual viewer will enjoy tracing the thought processes that grew into great art.

https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/matisse-in-the-studio

Proms in the Park – Hyde Park (September 9)
Proms in the Park – Hyde Park (September 9)
Staged in conjunction with the Last Night of the Proms, this outdoor event has the same end-of-term jollity that has made the indoor event such a national treasure. Lending classically trained discipline to pop and rock is one of the BBC’s main successes in recent years and this event aims to continue the good work.

Speaking of national treasures, Hyde Park will be like a pirates cave of glittering talent. West End legend, Michael Ball will be hosting such luminaries as Elaine Page, Sir Bryn Terfel, Sir Ray Davies and (no laughing at the back, there) Steps! As usual, the audience matters more than the performers as Londoners bid farewell to another summer full of musical wonder.

https://www.royalalberthall.com/tickets/proms/proms-2017/proms-in-the-park/

Foo Fighters – O2 Arena (September 19)
Foo Fighters – O2 Arena (September 19)
It is accepted wisdom in the rock business that if a band wants to commit commercial and artistic suicide they can a) endorse the killing of baby dolphins or b) follow the Foo Fighters on stage. The band’s ferocious commitment to hard riffing is legendary and in frontman Dave Grohl, they have a fearless leader whose razor blade voice can outlast the audience over three deafening and sweat-soaked hours.

They also have a set list full of hard driving anthems that are tailor made for crowd participation. No fancy guitar solos or piano ballads: just heads down rocking from beginning to end. Some fans used to hanker for a Nirvana song or two as Grohl was the drummer for the iconic grunge three piece, but the Foo Fighters have maintained their integrity on that score, reasoning that they’ve got more than enough hits to go round.

https://www.theo2.co.uk/events/detail/foo-fighters

Rachel Whiteread – Tate Britain
Rachel Whiteread – Tate Britain
The first female winner of the Turner Prize exhibits a retrospective of her dynamically illustrious career. Over a quarter of a century ago Whiteread burst onto the arts scene with her large form casts of the interiors of buildings which she then presented as giant sculptures/installations.

She was also capable of making objects of surprising delicacy which belied the industrial methods used. Indeed, these techniques became something of an artistic journey in themselves. Moulds were fashioned using resin, plaster, rubber and metal: each one bringing a particular textural intimacy to even the most imposing structures.

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/exhibition/rachel-whiteread

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